MD and Chef Team - The Show!

What does Nutrition have to do with Brain/Mental Health & Anxiety?

February 19, 2022 Dr. Isabel MD & Culinary Nutrition Expert Chef Michael Season 3 Episode 4
MD and Chef Team - The Show!
What does Nutrition have to do with Brain/Mental Health & Anxiety?
Show Notes Transcript

✅  Today we hear from the MD and Chef Team!

Well, I want to start off this by just an observation. Have you noticed that the world has just gone agro or aggressive? We walking around on eggshells anymore so much around people. You know, that we might just say something innocently or it might do something innocently and I mean, I know road rage is an example all over the world, but also even in conversations, you could just be having a conversation, and all of a sudden, boom, it just explodes.

✅  So what's going on? Well, yes, we're talking anxiety, depression, and brain health, but I mean, we're talking emotions, the emotions of people and what I've noticed over the last probably 10 years, but definitely over the last five years, how the emotional stability of people has basically gone off.  So today we want to talk about that emotional stability, anxiety and depression, brain health what's diet got to do with this.


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Speaker 0 (0s): Coming up on this episode of the MD and chef team show. 

Speaker 1 (8s): And so we have, well, we have a healthy metabolism also through proper nutrition. It helps us to be who we want to be emotionally and not who we are don't want to be or not who we are when we're hungry, hungry, get away from me. Don't talk to me. And that's when the metabolism body metabolism is out of control. You know, it's gone the up and down all over the place. And what we've done is we've disconnected certain areas that should be connected. 

And we've 

Speaker 0 (44s): Welcome to the show from DMD and shop team. I'm Dr. Isabel medical doctor here at the MD and chef team. 

Speaker 1 (53s): I'm chef Michael Coleman nutrition expert. I'm the chef part of the cave. 

Speaker 0 (58s): And what are we going to talk about bed? Now? I can see that cause he's my husband. 

Speaker 1 (1m 2s): Well, then we'll be talking about marriage relationship, parenting intimacy. Talk about mindsets that success overcoming depression, anxiety, I'll be getting into functional nutrition, recipes and tips from the kitchen. And we're going to both get into how to live a long, healthy, vibrant life. 

Speaker 0 (1m 21s): Yes, I love it. Our mission is to help you prevent and reverse the disease and give you both in the process. Oh yeah. We might have 

Speaker 1 (1m 38s): The question. What does nutrition have to do with anxiety and depression and brain health? Right? Does it matter? Is it got anything to do with it? 

Speaker 0 (1m 50s): I'll tell you right now. 

Speaker 1 (1m 54s): That's why. And the answer is no. So anyway, thanks. Great to see you. Bye for now. Go ahead and 

Speaker 0 (1m 59s): Eat all the junk you want no big deal. 

Speaker 1 (2m 1s): It won't hurt. Oh my gosh. Well, I want to start off this by just an observation. Have you noticed that the world has just gone agro or, you know, aggressive, whatever term you want to use? I mean, are we walking around on eggshells anymore so much around people? You know, that we might just say something innocently or it might do something innocently and just, you know, I mean, I know road rage is, is an example all over the world, but also even in conversations, you could just, you know, be lively down in a conversation, all of a sudden, boom, it just explodes. 

I mean, we just started a point where we're walking on eggshells around people. So what's going on? Well, yes, we're talking anxiety, depression, and brain health, but I mean, we're talking emotions, the emotional of people and what I've noticed over the last probably 10 years, but definitely over the last five years, how the emotional stability of, of people has basically gone off. And it was going to say, honey, if you want to hit that button up there, check and see if there's anything 

Speaker 0 (3m 19s): I'm in control of the controls, 

Speaker 1 (3m 24s): Right? 

Speaker 0 (3m 28s): I'm typing in the chat. 

Speaker 1 (3m 29s): Hello. So today we want to talk about that emotional stability, anxiety and depression, brain health what's diet got to do with this. So I want to start off with talking about two areas of the brain. One is called the amygdala. Now the amigdala is a almond size cluster. That's basically at the base of the brain base of the neck down in here. All right. So the amygdala, the purpose of the amygdala, that is our emotional response area. 

It's the fight or flight area. One thing to understand about the amygdala is the amigdala is reactionary. It's not as it may go. I just reacts to things. It also carries memory responses of things that we have done in the past and what our memory says we should do. So then a Migdal is something that a, it really defines and regulates emotions. It reacts to fight and flight and those types of emotions. 

Now, the other area, which is called our frontal lobes, that's right here at the front, the front part of the brain that, you know, the kind of the big part of the brain that is the adult in the room, the frontal lobes are the adults in the room and the, and the frontal lobes help us to make rational decisions, mature decisions. And so the frontal lobes, can I find it so fascinating? I, the frontal lobes can overrule 

Speaker 0 (5m 11s): Love. It's just one. We've just got one 

Speaker 1 (5m 13s): Frontal lobe on each side, we'll have a discussion. I will Google it. Right. 

Speaker 0 (5m 23s): But I just remember from my neuro anatomy, it was just one, but yeah, it could be 

Speaker 1 (5m 29s): Sorry. Anyway, your neurological anatomy, neuro 

Speaker 0 (5m 34s): Anatomy, but that was a long, long 

Speaker 1 (5m 36s): Time ago. Well, the frontal lobes, what that does is it is the, like I said, the adult in the room, but the frontal lobes can override the amygdala. So when the amygdala is the reactionary part, the frontal lobes are more the response. So when there's flight or fight or emotions or things going on, well, the amygdala just does it. But the frontal lobes, the adult in the room has the opportunity to say, nah, we probably shouldn't do that. 

Let's not react that way. Let's just respond this way. And so those frontal lobes can override the amygdala and Michael's right at it. There are two frontal lobes. Well, I got that one too. Wow. So here's the interesting thing. And when I use the term poor diet, we don't have time to get into all that today, but just to understand what I'm talking, poor diet, I basically meaning you're not getting any live food in you all day long. 

You're not eating pretty much a plant-based diet. You're not getting all your good veggies and greens and all the live food all day long, you're eating dead food. Frankenfoods packets, sachets, fast foods, things loaded with sugars and hydrogenated oils and deep fried and all that kind of stuff. That's kind of the basis of your daily eating lifestyle and too much caffeine, too much alcohol, sugary drinks and all that kind of stuff. 

So when I took, so when I say poor diet, that you kind of understand what I'm talking about there. So what a poor diet does, it actually activates highly activates the amygdala. It makes it react even more the fight or flight. And what it does is it disconnect the frontal lobes. So it causes the frontal lobes that adult in the room to kind of like disconnect. 

So now all of a sudden we don't have this adult in the room, the frontal lobes to override the amygdala reactionary part of our brain. So what you're finding is in today's world because of poor diet, you've got a lot of people who are running around reacting to things because of the junk food that they're eating because of the poor diet, which cuts off the connection to the frontal lobe, which is the adult. Right? And so there, you're not getting the overrides. 

You're not getting the mature, rational override to say, whoa, wait a second. Okay. I understand this might not be a good decision, you know, cause we're all we get all kinds of flight or fright all day long fight or flight things happen all day long, where we go, oh, okay, I'm going to go to the other side of the street or I should be driving this way. Or I shouldn't go down the alley or a phone call comes that kind of throws you off. It's something that's not that good. 

Well, you know, there's no rational speaking through it and coming up to a positive way of handling that. It's like, well, what are you doing? What are you talking about? No, no, no. That doesn't know what you're talking about. Yeah. And so when you understand that in those two areas, when we're talking about the poor diet, how the frontal lobe, now, all of a sudden doesn't have that response to override the reactionary amygdala. 

And then we also have a thing called hypoglycemia that that's more the medical term or the detailed term. But basically that means has anybody ever had low blood sugar, low blood sugar during the day you get that point of the day where you're kind of like, and you're almost like, oh man, I got to grab something here. Oh, don't talk to me right now. I'm just like, oh, I can't have no, I can't handle it right now. Just I gotta eat something. I gotta eat something. You know, that, that feeling that's your low blood sugar. 

And what happens is when that happens is our body has a beautiful system of saying, whoa, emergency emergency, low blood sugar, low blood sugar emergency. And bam. It, it produces higher, the stress hormones, cortisol, adrenaline, and cortisol. Right. And I'll understand those are stress hormones, but what they do is they help us to kind of get back up again. 

However, when those are being produced and their stress hormones, they're activating the amygdala. And so all of a sudden, again, we've got the reactionary, emotional part of our brain, like on that we can see it everywhere and you can see it around. And so when we have hypoglycemia, which we all get low blood sugar, but the key is to have a balanced metabolism where it's, you know, it's just kind of, yeah, we get little dips, but it's not peaks and valleys and you know, okay, I'm cool. 

Oh, I did a copy and a brownie and I'm good. And oh my gosh, I got to eat some cookies and Coke or something, you know, and we're just going up and down. And the emotions are flying all over the place. And these have so much to do with our brain health. Now, please understand that nutrition. Isn't the only thing that affects our brain health, anxiety, depression. It's not the only thing. However, it is very, very important because of our body systems and what, how, what we eat affects what's going on in all our hormones and everything else that our body is creating in the way our brain is thinking and how it affects that. 

Now I wanted to ask you about BDNF, 

Speaker 0 (12m 2s): BDNF, B D 

Speaker 1 (12m 4s): N 

Speaker 0 (12m 5s): B D. 

Speaker 1 (12m 7s): Yes, B 

Speaker 0 (12m 8s): D. And do you want me to tell you about, 

Speaker 1 (12m 11s): Can you just give us a little synopsis of what BDNF is? 

Speaker 0 (12m 16s): Sure. So BDNF stands for brain derived neurotrophic factor. It's we call it the fertilizer, the brain fertilizer, you know, when you're planting, like I'm going to be planting some sunflowers soon and chef Michael's going to help me get the garden ready so that when we plant the seed right back. Yes. And when we plant the seed in the beautiful fertilizer, organic fertilizer it'll allow the sunflowers to grow well. 

BDNF is the brain's fertilizer, so that nerves can be con con can connect and discuss with each other. Instead of nerves, nerve cells being way apart from each other, they're connected. They grow into each other. Then they start talking. It helps you grow your brain. BDNF helps you grow your brain. No, 

Speaker 1 (13m 9s): That sounds like a very important thing to have in good brain. Yes, it is very foreign protein to be having working properly. Now here's the thing. Research has shown that sugar and the more sugar we have decreases the BDNF in our brain. 

Speaker 0 (13m 30s): Very good point. Very good 

Speaker 1 (13m 32s): Point. So, I mean, you know, with Isabella and I, we work with Alzheimer's patients reversing that and preventing that, and BDNF is such an important part, but we also understand that the brain, when it starts to feed off of sugars, it's basically bottom line, is it switches off? Right? And so, again, that's back to the diet. 

Speaker 0 (13m 54s): So sugar, sugar 

Speaker 1 (13m 57s): Decreases, decreases the production of BDNF BDNF. 

Speaker 0 (14m 3s): When we eat sugar, decreases the production of BDNF and our brain. So our brain doesn't have the fertilizer to grow and make the connections. And so you may start experiencing brain fog. You may start experiencing word loss, yak, you're in the middle of a sentence. And you're like, what's that word? It's a simple word. Ah, that might be happening because your brain cells aren't connecting and talking to each other. Yeah. Good point then. 

Speaker 1 (14m 30s): No, thank you. Yeah. So here's the thing with healthy metabolism. You can actually be who you want to be emotionally. There's a book written back in the mid 1990s, I think 1995 by a gentleman named Daniel Goldman. And he introduced what's called emotional intelligence EDI. Cause we didn't really think much about emotional intelligence until then, and talks about emotional intelligence and how, you know, when we develop our emotional intelligence, that helps us to be who we want to be. 

And so we have, when we have a healthy metabolism also through proper nutrition, it helps us to be who we want to be emotionally and not who a are, don't want to be or not who we are when we're hungry, hungry, get away from me. Don't talk to me. And that's when the MME, our body metabolism is out of control. You know, it's gone up and down all over the place. And what we've done is we've disconnected certain areas that should be connected and we've activated areas that shouldn't be highly activated and just from the whole body system out of whack. 

And a lot of times we just think about that physically, you know, physically, oh, well, you know, okay. You know, I gotta make sure I don't have fat in a belly and all this kind of stuff, but it's actually, what's going on up here. It's really, really affecting our brains, throwing us off. As far as depression, anxiety, it affects the way we think the way we think positively the way we think about the world, where we react about the world. And then also in all other areas of brain health, it's just starts to throw it all off. 

And again, as I talked about today, I think it's just making the world. I grew up because we're walking around on eggshells on everybody and people are just kind of reacting to things. And we've lost this art of being able to respond and work together as rational human beings. 

Speaker 0 (16m 38s): I love it. It's a good re it. It just helps you understand the mess that is out there and how people need to take responsibility of what they're putting into their mouth. Yeah, 

Speaker 1 (16m 48s): Yeah. Yeah. Did you have anything else you wanted to add? 

Speaker 0 (16m 52s): I hadn't, you know, I, I just, I, I just say, look, if you, if you're having, if you're having one of those episodes, you know, where you are anxious or you're starting to feel very depressed, just think back, what did you eat over the last half hour? What did you eat over the last hour? And just be very aware. Did I just eat a candy bar and a soda? Did I just eat a muffin and a cup of coffee? 

Well, you know what, if you're starting to crash, it's because your blood sugar is starting to crash. So just think back, am I eating clean, healthy, live food? Or am I eating dead poisonous food? That's making me unwell and, and react on, well, just think back on what you're eating and yes, food is medicine, but it can also be your 

Speaker 1 (17m 47s): Poison. Yeah. The full story is food is medicine and food can be poisoned. Yes. Yes. You know, we're just you saying that reminded me of a funny story at kind of ties into it a little bit, but how food just, not just physically, but emotionally affects us and how we react is I remember a time and you, of course remember this. When we were doing a presentation to a gentleman at lunchtime who wanted it, he wanted to hear about some things we were doing. And if you know anything about Isabelle, if you've seen her here now, you know, you're not going to fall asleep, just chatting for Isabelle for 15 to 20 minutes. 

Okay. It just, that's just not the way it works anyway, but it was just after this gentleman's lunch. And within two minutes, he was just, well, he had a pie. Well, yeah. I was going to say that 

Speaker 0 (18m 38s): Not an apple pie. We're talking about 

Speaker 1 (18m 40s): A meat pie. Yeah. So he was just not enough. And, and, you know, we asked him, I, I forget his name. Let's just say, it's John. It's like, John, you just had lunch. What'd you have for lunch? I had a pie and a coffee and I dunno, I think he had a brown or something or a biscuit or something, or a cookie. I mean, look at that. Yeah. Yeah. He got, he kinda got a low sugar, Russia lunch, but here it was, you know, 15, 20 minutes, half hour. I'm not sure exactly when after his lunch and he was out, he would had crashed and it just shows how that, that can happen. 

And he, you know, there was no, you know, let's not even bother going on. You know, 

Speaker 0 (19m 22s): We wanted to slap him, but I did. I, 

Speaker 1 (19m 28s): Well, hopefully you're a big deal. It wasn't running. 

Speaker 0 (19m 31s): Della was fine. I can, my frontal love 

Speaker 1 (19m 33s): Controlled my mate. Right? You're a big bolus that just slapping Rome is overriding that you used to say nice things to John. And then we'll just excuse ourself and go because 

Speaker 0 (19m 54s): I ate a good 

Speaker 1 (19m 55s): Lunch that day. 

Speaker 0 (19m 57s): Calling all women. Are you feeling depressed, anxious, lacking in energy, having problems sleeping all night long, waking up with brain fog, or maybe even hopelessness. And you know that there is a better you that wants to come out. Hello, it's me, Dr. Isabel. And wow. If any of this sounds like you, I get you. I have been in this place and I really wish someone who really knew what I was going through would have been there to help me through to the other side of that deep dark place. 

That's why I started the shame-free anxiety and depression community for women only. It's a free and private Facebook group. Would you like weekly coaching to help you become your best self? And how about being inspired and encouraged by other women in the community? We now know that we grow better in community and not alone. The link is in the podcast description, or you can search in Facebook for the shame-free anxiety and depression community for women it's free, it's private and it's safe. 

I hope to see you there soon. 

Speaker 2 (21m 23s): Hello, chef Michael here. If you enjoyed today's episode, we would love it. If you subscribe to the podcast and left us a review.